Why should you never tell secrets in a corn field?

Because they’re all ears!

Did you know?

Corn was one of the main seeds or grains that the First Fleet brought to Australia.

Corn can be dried and stored over winter, which makes it a good food for a new colony. Ground-up dried corn makes cornmeal, which can be used in bread and porridge when soaked.

Sweet Grass

The sweet varieties of corn we eat are all different kinds of maize. Maize has been used for centuries to feed animals. Now it is one of the most important crops in the world, used for animal feed and biofuels.

Maize is a grass. So the sweetcorn on the cob we eat is an overgrown, sweet grass head.

Floating on the breeze

Corn is pollinated by wind. That’s why it has bunches of strings, called tassels, instead of flowers.

A single corn tassel produces up to 60 million tiny grains of pollen.

These tiny specks float on the wind and can travel kilometres in minutes. They land on the tassels of other corn plants and they pollinate the other plant.

Each strand of ‘silk’ – the strings in the tassel – is attached to one corn kernel. An ear of corn is like a circuit board with one string for every single kernel.

The string’s job is to pollinate its kernel, and when a kernel is pollinated it swells into the fat, juicy (usually yellow) kernel that we eat.

Once the kernel is pollinated, the string isn’t needed, and it dries up. That’s how you can tell a ripe corn cob; by its dark brown, shrivelled silks.

Corn Dollies

These traditional dolls are made of wheat, not corn. Why? Because the word ‘corn’ used to mean any kind of grain, usually the most important grain in the area. Corn dollies can be made of wheat, barley or oats – any long, tufted grass.

Here are instructions on how to make them, from the Eden Project in the UK: http://www.edenproject.com/learn/for-everyone/how-to-make-a-corn-dolly

Why should you never tell secrets in a corn field?

Because they’re all ears!

Did you know?

Corn was one of the main seeds or grains that the First Fleet brought to Australia.

Corn can be dried and stored over winter, which makes it a good food for a new colony. Ground-up dried corn makes cornmeal, which can be used in bread and porridge when soaked.

Sweet Grass

The sweet varieties of corn we eat are all different kinds of maize. Maize has been used for centuries to feed animals. Now it is one of the most important crops in the world, used for animal feed and biofuels.

Maize is a grass. So the sweetcorn on the cob we eat is an overgrown, sweet grass head.

Floating on the breeze

Corn is pollinated by wind. That’s why it has bunches of strings, called tassels, instead of flowers.

A single corn tassel produces up to 60 million tiny grains of pollen.

These tiny specks float on the wind and can travel kilometres in minutes. They land on the tassels of other corn plants and they pollinate the other plant.

Each strand of ‘silk’ – the strings in the tassel – is attached to one corn kernel. An ear of corn is like a circuit board with one string for every single kernel.

The string’s job is to pollinate its kernel, and when a kernel is pollinated it swells into the fat, juicy (usually yellow) kernel that we eat.

Once the kernel is pollinated, the string isn’t needed, and it dries up. That’s how you can tell a ripe corn cob; by its dark brown, shrivelled silks.

Corn Dollies

These traditional dolls are made of wheat, not corn. Why? Because the word ‘corn’ used to mean any kind of grain, usually the most important grain in the area. Corn dollies can be made of wheat, barley or oats – any long, tufted grass.

Here are instructions on how to make them, from the Eden Project in the UK: http://www.edenproject.com/learn/for-everyone/how-to-make-a-corn-dolly

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Check out our delicious recipes using corn